7 Ways to Hide a Bad Stain

Posted by on Aug 14, 2012

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There's no use crying over spilled milk — or coffee or ketchup. Not when we've found so many crafty ways to hide a bad stain. From cutting away the stain and replacing it with a peek-a-boo doily to sequined pie collars and even spray-painted lace designs, we're sharing our favorite DIY refashions to rescue our treasured clothes (and also hide how very, very klutzy we are).

doily sweater
All Doily-ed Up 

Accidently throw a batch of bleach in with your delicates? A doily can hide the discoloring while also adding a touch of old-fashioned charm to even the newest of sweaters. Customize the doily by dyeing it with blackberry or coffee dye. Cut away the stained fabric for a sexy-sweet lace cut-out.
Interested in adding a doily to your stained clothes? We've got the free how-to at CraftFoxes
shoes refashioned with paint
Scuff Love 

Lovely heels and flats can only stay new so long, but with this intriguing shoe refashion, scuffs can hide behind leftover paint. On a modernized take on the penny loafer, consider using chalkboard paint on the toe of your shoes to chalk in a new design each day. 
14 Shades of Grey shows how to refashion your shoes with paint. 
reverse applique
Inside Out 

If the idea of giving your clothes a trim inspires wonder rather than fear, reverse appliquing a T-shirt or trouser just may be the ticket. Excerpted from the book “Improv Sewing,” the stain is cut away and then inlayed with a contrasting fabric to create a patternless design.
The free reverse applique how-to is also available here at CraftFoxes
flower corsage
A Petaled Lapel

No longer constrained to awkward Prom Night pinnings, this DIY corsage uses exotic layering and sophisticated colors to hide unsightly stains. Whether sewn to a pin or attached permanently to the clothes, this DIY jewelry can be customized using floaty chiffons for a delicate touch, thickened with yarn in a crochet flower or even embroidered using leftover felt. 
For the dahlia corsage head to Holidash
refashioned T-shirt
Lace Face 

While spray paint on a shirt may be precisely the stain some of us want to hide, others might be intrigued by this how-to, which uses scrap lace as a template for spray paint. Customize the look by using the lace to paint letters or even a silhouette.
Head to Completely Unfinished for the complete how-to on spray painting lace onto your stained clothes.
refashioned T-shirt
Leather and Lace

Not up for graffiti-fying your T-shirt or jeans? Consider embellishing stained apparel with easier-to-use fabric paint and a stencil. Sequins along the neckline offer another unique touch. 
Grab the free T-shirt refashion from Jezebel
button badge corsage
Red Badge of Courage 

This easy button badge adds almost immediate charm to a lipsticked lapel and is small enough to carry around in a clutch for any future accidents. Buy the fabric-covered buttons or make your own via your scrap stash.
Polly Danger shares this free button badge how-to. 
sequined collar
Sequins of Events

Makeup or dirt on a collar, one of the most common clothing stains, can easily be hidden behind a sequined Peter Pan collar. Personalize this idea by lining sleeve cuffs or hem lines with sequined fabric for an extra splash of glamour. 
Learn more about making your own sequin collar via Transient Expression
bleach jeans
Bleached Out   

If bleach led you to this article, then perhaps it can also get you out. Acid wash your jeans with bleach or even consider using a silhouette or other shape, outlined with bleach or dye, to hide a stain. 
La Rue Neuve shares how to acid wash your stained jeans using bleach. 

Image credit (from top): Flickr.com/PinkSherbetPhotography, Martena Duss / Sissi Holleis, 14 Shades of Grey, Chronicle Books, Holidash, Completely Unfinished, Jezebel, Polly Danger, Transient Expression and La Rue Neuve



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